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Band of Brothers: Boy Seamen in the Royal Navy 1800-1956 David Ph

Band of Brothers: Boy Seamen in the Royal Navy 1800-1956 - David Phillipson

Stroud: Sutton Publishing, 1996, Hardback in Dust Wrapper.
Condition: Very Good+ — in Very Good+ Dust Wrapper.

Contains: Black & white photographs;

From the cover: “Band of Brothers is a revealing history of the boy seaman rating in the Royal Navy, beginning with its evolution from the eighteenth-century ‘Officer’s Servant’ through to its abolition in 1956. It tells of an astonishing Victorian naval tradition which continued right into the modern age. HMS Ganges, a byword on the lower deck of the Royal Navy for rigorous — not to say harsh — discipline, was the toughest of the boy seaman training establishments.

The tradition, for which Ganges was widely regarded as the archetype, lasted almost to the threshold of the permissive society of the 1960s. Throughout those years the Royal Navy was a supremely conservative and traditionalist institution, and never more so than in its attitude to and treatment of its lower deck people — its boys in particular. This led a future First Sea Lord to describe HMS Ganges as late as the 1950s as the most feudal of the Navy’s institutions.

David Phillipson describes in detail such aspects of service life as recruitment, feeding and clothing, training, discipline and punishment, and daily life ashore and afloat, in peace and war. His narrative is supported by a selection of vivid personal memoirs by boy seamen who later went on to serve in the Royal Navy as men. The author concludes his history with a personal account of his own life at HMS Ganges as a boy entrant after the Second World War, drawn from his own detailed diaries.”


Size: 9½" x 6¼". Red boards with Gilt titling to the Spine. [X] 150 pages.
£11.80
Band of Brothers: Boy Seamen in the Royal Navy 1800-1956 David Ph