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Charles Rennie Mackintosh - Edmund Swinglehurst

Rochester: Grange Books, 2001, Hardback in Dust Wrapper.
Condition: Very Good — in Very Good Dust Wrapper. Light pull to the head of the upper panel, with age-toning to the verso of the dust wrapper. Price Clipped. Text complete, clean and tight.

Contains: Black & white photographs; Colour plates;

From the cover: “The Glaswegian architect, designer and painter was a man ahead of his time. His work, which was as imaginative and original as that of other artists and architects of the Art Nouveau period, also extended in other directions and became an inspiration to other aspiring artists.

In his own time and environment, however, Mackintosh was largely ignored, apart from a few enlightened patrons such as Walter Blackie, the publisher, and Catherine Cranston, who was more or less responsible for the Glasgow tea room phenomenon, which provided places where women, especially, could socially meet.

Mackintosh and his friends, Herbert McNair and the Macdonald sisters, became known as The Four, and were products of the Glasgow School of Art. Under Francis Newbery, the director, a talented nucleus of artists was established, whose work gained recognition throughout Europe.

Mackintosh became a draftsman in the firm of Honeyman & Keppie, later becoming a partner and designing, among other public buildings, the modern Glasgow School of Art. He also designed several interiors at a time when most houses were cluttered with unnecessary paraphernalia, and designed the appropriate furniture for them.

There was little work for a modern designer, however, and Mackintosh finally moved to London, then France, where he dedicated himself to painting a remarkable series of original works; at the time, these were not in the fashionable mainstream of French art, but have become as highly prized as his furniture pieces and other designs.”


Size: 12¼" x 9½". Matching Pictorial boards. 141 pages.
£16.30
Charles Rennie Mackintosh Edmund Swinglehurst